About us

Foundation for Fundamental Rights

The FFR is an organisation of attorneys and socially active individuals working towards the advancement, protection and enforcement of fundamental human rights. We at FFR represent those who have been denied their rights to due process due to drone strikes in Waziristan or forced disappearances in the cities of Pakistan and against the excesses of the Pakistani state and foreign governments.


What is L.A.W. ?

Legal Aid for Waziristan

The Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) are a group of small administrative units in the northwest of Pakistan, lying between the provinces of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Balochistan and the neighbouring country of Afghanistan. They comprise of seven tribal agencies and six smaller frontier regions including north and south Waziristan.

The Constitution of Pakistan governs FATA through rules left by the British in 1901 – the Frontier Crimes Regulations (FCR). The FCR was declared ‘black law’ by the Supreme Court of Pakistan in 1995, however the legislature has failed to provide the tribal people with a system of governance ensuring rights of individuals in the constitution. The Jurisdiction of the Supreme Court and High Courts of Pakistan do not extend directly to FATA and Provincially Administered Tribal Areas (PATA), according to Article 247 and 248 of the 1973 Constitution of Pakistan. The Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Provincial Assembly has no power in FATA, and can only exercise its powers in PATA. The assembly cannot implement the law directly as it can do in other parts of the province or Settled Areas of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. This has created a political vacuum in FATA, Frontier Regions and PATA. Such lawless conditions as the absence of government departments such as the police, judiciary and local government or civic amenities, are said to serve the interests of terrorists. There are no civil, sessions or Higher courts of Pakistan in Tribal Areas.

Armed conflict in the region began in 2004 as a consequence of the war in Afghanistan and for the last seven years, drone strikes have repeatedly been carried out by unmanned aerial vehicles as part of the war against terror.

In this hunt for suspected militants, the number of civilian deaths is largely speculative. Attacks are conducted based upon dubious reporting by local agencies and contractors. There is no declared war, yet the State seems to have given its consent to these attacks.

We at FFR represent those who have been denied their rights to due process due to drone strikes in Waziristan or forced disappearances in the cities of Pakistan and against the excesses of the Pakistani state and foreign governments.